The Changing Seasons – July 2019

July — Winter.  Fade to red.

I am the first to admit that July almost always represents the winter of my soul (not discontent; that would be going too far).  At this time of year my mind tends to dwell on the negative and by some unconscious impulse, I dress in mourning.  This year my existential July crisis has been exacerbated by some serious hypoglycemia incidents that I have suffered, leaving me wondering each night whether this will be the time I don’t wake up in the morning.  So I often don’t go to bed.  That’s tiring and ineffective.  My little dog also requires a full-time carer.  (That’s another story.  Also tiring).

You know that feeling when you are so tired that you think it wouldn’t be so bad if you died but, at the same time, you want to cling on to dear life because your family, friends and animals need you?  It is a conundrum.  (My apologies, ladies and gentlemen, this is turning out rather more solemn than I expected.  Also, Martha Kennedy has written a blog like this recently.  Bear with me.)  By some other unconscious impulse, I seek sanctuary outdoors.  Made glorious by the sun and wind.  (Sorry.  I couldn’t resist).  What did I learn? Read more

Dream Lover

When I first started blogging, I realised I had to take some photos to accompany my words.  Now, after nearly two years of blogging (how is that possible?), I search for words to accompany my photos.  This blogging business has also re-ignited my True Love’s passion for his own photography.  He hasn’t been this happy in a long time.  Maybe we will find what we are looking for someday. Read more

Parrots Preening

One of my favourite obsessions is to try to get decent bird photos.  It is not so easy with the little birds, but I have been having a little more luck with the parrots.  We have been having very grey days in wintry Canberra.  When the sun shows itself, I quickly grab my coat and go out for a walk or take a cup of coffee outside and park myself in a sunny spot.  I am not alone in finding the sun soothing.  The parrots have been enjoying a few rays too, ruffling their feathers as though to trap all the warmth in the pockets of air they create. Read more

The End Is Nigh My Flower

One must not be subtle or delicate about climate emergencies.

Who shall dry my tears
when the flowers are gone?
Not the morally bankrupt,
nor the weekend warriors.
Caught in your own bubble
of flattery and deceit.
Walk into my parlour.  Take
your seat. Parliament is now in session
and treachery abounds.
Watch your step, watch your back,
said the spider to the clown.
What goes around, comes around.
Earth, she will not wait. Read more

Lens-Artists Challenge – Less Is More

This week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is hosted by Amy.  Her chosen theme is “less is more“.  Amy’s inspiration for this theme is a quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupery:

“A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” 

Now that is a very intriguing notion to me, because it seems to me that there is nothing more perfect than nature’s design. Read more

Dangerous Liaisons?

Hello Groovers, I was going to start with a joke about how I’ve been hanging out in a hotbed of radicalism, but that doesn’t seem very appropriate now.  So instead, I will tell you about how lovely it was to spend last weekend at the National Folk Festival (Canberra) with many people of goodwill.  Admittedly we were a little cranky given the political times/blame games, but we took our frustrations out in peaceful and creative ways, such as through humour, verse and songs of kindness.  Here’s how it goes. Read more

Animal Farm

Once upon a time, yellow box and red gum grassy woodlands stretched from Toowoomba to Victoria (Australia), providing a continuous wildlife corridor 100-150 kilometres in width and 1,500 km in length.  Since colonisation, vast swathes of grassy woodland have been cleared for agriculture.  Now there may be as little as 1-5 percent remaining. most of which has been modified in some way by grazing.  Many birds and animals have become trapped in isolated communities, reducing valuable genetic diversity and leaving them vulnerable to threats of local habitat loss.  It is not surprising then, that yellow box and red gum grassy woodlands have been declared a critically endangered ecological community. Read more