Flashing Lights

Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, ladies and gentlemen, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.

Can you guess the tune?

The photo is of a soon-to-be new suburb on the outskirts of Canberra. Well, I don’t have a photo of the sprawling outskirts of Sydney (Australia’s largest capital city), and I won’t be going there for a while, if ever. Not my favourite place, ladies and gentlemen. It is a little too large for me. Lotta cars. Lotta cars. Lotta hard-working, hard-living people.

Sydney folk are struggling to get on top of the latest outbreak of coronavirus. It’s scary and scarring. Devastating for all concerned. The state Premier has extended the lockdown (I agree with the Premier that lockdown is a horrible word). She has also designated this August vaccination month. To date, only 14% of Aussies are fully vaccinated. Of course, I would like to know what the Premier is planning beyond August. Surely she would not ease all restrictions and allow the outbreak to seed into regions beyond Greater Sydney? I’m assuming that since the Premier has re-allocated some vaccine doses intended for rural communities to metro Sydney instead, that she will be mindful of the vulnerability of regional areas.

Show us how it’s done, Sydney. You can get it under control. Well, maybe not dick for brains who punched the police horse in the mouth during last weekend’s illegal lockdown protest. Sydneysiders, make sure you order that computer from JB because you’ll need a computer, and a good internet connection, to keep up with all the exposure sites. Anyway, it’s both a together thing and an individual thing being Covid-safe. But generally, it’s up to you. Bit like the Nutbush really.

International readers may not be aware that Aussies created a dance to Nutbush City Limits in the 1970s. I’ve heard it described as a line dance. What the *#^! I guarantee that no-one dancing the Nutbush in the discos and school halls across Australia during the 70s had ever heard of a line dance! You’ve got homework to do, ladies and gentlemen. Watch the dance vid below a couple of times, then grab your household contacts and dance your blues away. I would join you except I went for a longish walk today in hiking shoes that I hadn’t worn for a year. Let’s not go there.

Enjoy. It’s the 2016 Nutbush Party Fun at Ceroc.

Stay cool, everyone.

Kind Regards.
Tracy.

Absent Friends

Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, ladies and gentlemen, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.

In July 2019, I participated in the Share Your Music Challenge – one song every day that month. At the end of the month, I breathed a sigh of relief that I had managed to make it through the challenge and was ready to hang up my air guitar. One of my Canadian readers urged me to keep going and so my Friday Song Day and a musical exchange began. This interaction brought me great joy.

These days I have fewer Canadian readers – death, old age, illness, pandemics, caring responsibilities, other commitments, etc, have intervened. For several weeks I have been concerned for my musical buddies, Sid and J. Today I have chosen a musical piece for them both and their loved ones. The piece is Ravel’s Miroirs III – Une Barque sur L’Ocean, performed by renowned Canadian pianist André Laplante.

This beautiful piece and performance is a gift to us all. I know Sid and J would approve. Enjoy.

Let kindness and compassion be your legacy, ladies and gentlemen.

Love to you all.
Tracy.

Hold The Line

Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, ladies and gentlemen, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.

Who is an essential worker? That is the question that the New South Wales Premier has refused to answer. Politics! Meanwhile, cases of the Delta variant grow in Sydney (Australia). The Premier is not personally to blame for the increase in cases, but it would be helpful if she could say who should stay at home under her government’s lockdown provisions. I am sure she will get around to it soon because she is a sensible woman. A few more people may have to die first before official advice is given.

I send all my love to family and friends in Sydney. Thinking of you. You can do this. My thoughts are also with all those in hospital at the moment and with the families who have lost loved ones to Covid.

Today, we need a big song. This is for everyone in Sydney and other parts of the world who are dealing with the horrors of Covid at the moment. The song is Hold The Line by Toto.

Stay safe, everyone.

Kind Regards.
Tracy.

Photo Credit: J Bar, Fairfield Railway Station, Wikimedia Commons

Celebration Of Country And Culture

Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, ladies and gentlemen, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.

It is NAIDOC Week in Australia. During NAIDOC week, celebrations are held across Australia to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (First Nations) peoples. There are around 500 First Nations groups, each with their own culture, language, beliefs and practices. I think we should celebrate NAIDOC week with a couple of songs, but before we do, I would like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the traditional custodians of the land where I live, the Ngunnawal people.

It was a difficult choice as there are so many wonderful performers from which to choose, but today I have decided to go with Emily Wurramara’s wonderful performance at TEDx, of three songs – Black Smoke, Hey Love and Ngerraberrakernama – from her first album. Since some of my fellow Aussies are in lockdown this weekend, I chose this longer video, rather than limiting my choice to just one song. Ms Wurramara takes inspiration from family and childhood home of Bickerton (Milyakburra in language) and Groote Eyelandt in the Top End. I think we all want to go there. I hope you enjoy.

Take care, everyone. For those Aussies stranded overseas, I hope you will soon be able to return home.

Kind Regards.
Tracy.

Photo credit: NASA astronaut image of Bickerton Island in Australia, Wiki Commons

Rocky Times

Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, ladies and gentlemen, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.

Photo by Scott Webb on Pexels.com

What a rocky week it has been. In North America, record breaking heatwave exacerbated by climate change is killing people, flora and fauna, as well as damaging infrastructure and disrupting economic activity. In Australia, the national government announced it will provide a loan to a private company, Pembroke Resources (established 2014), for a new metallurgical coal mining project. The mine will have an operating life of 80 years. Pembroke Resources is owned by US private equity firm, Denham Capital. No pesky shareholders or bankers to worry about, but who is going to insure a project like that? Do Australian governments (there is bipartisan support for coal projects) really not care about the damage that our addiction to coal is causing? I wonder if all our fire fighters are vaccinated now in case they are called to help fight fires overseas this year?

Let’s not go there. It is too depressing.

However, since we are chatting about rocks, I learnt from another blogger, Martha Kennedy, that Colorado town, Crestone, is known for its geology and for the discovery of a partially mummified body of a cult leader at the town (see here). I guess it is pretty dry in Crestone. The name of the cult group is called “Love Has Won”. So naturally, I thought of the song, Love On The Rocks, written by Neil Diamond and Gilbert Bécaud. You thought that too, didn’t you? Anyway, it is my choice for Friday song day. Enjoy.

Cheers.

Kind Regards.
Tracy.

Timing

Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, ladies and gentlemen, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.

The people of eastern Australia spent another week on tenterhooks with coronavirus hotspots popping up across three states. Unvaccinated people took to their doonas or had parties, including at one state parliament house. I do note however that many health workers have been vaccinated so that is good news. Let the good times roll. In other news, one political party in a governing coalition had a leadership challenge while the leader of the other party in that coalition was in quarantine after returning from o/s. Yep, things are almost back to normal downunder. I imagine that developments overseas are just as challenging to the collective psyche. I don’t know about you, but I need to chill out. Let music fill the chamber, so to speak.

We can still make beautiful music if we work together. We can worry about the rakali another day (in joke).

Here is one of my favourite pieces – Ravel, Introduction and Allegro for flute, clarinet, harp and string quartet, performed by L’Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France. Enjoy.

Take care, everyone. Peace.

Kind Regards.
Tracy.

Bizarrely Enough

Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, ladies and gentlemen, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.

I have amended this blog post because I was rather unfair in some respects.

The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) has revised its advice on the AstraZeneca Covid 19 vaccine in response to new vaccine safety concerns. it has been recommended that administration of the AZ vaccine be suspended for the 50-59 age group. This group should instead have the Pfizer vaccine (excepting those who have already had their first dose without incident). The AZ vaccine is still recommended for those above 60 years of age. See here for the ATAGI advice.

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Crikey

Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, ladies and gentlemen, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.

It makes no sense, ladies and gentlemen. Australia’s borders seem to be both impenetrable and leak like a sieve. On the leaky side, SARS-Cov-2 continues to evade our border restrictions causing virus outbreaks in our largely unvaccinated capital cities. On the impenetrable side, around 250 Australian children are stranded in India without their parents and cannot return home without an adult to accompany them on the flight and in quarantine. Fair enough, but at the same time parents have been refused permission to travel to India to collect their children, and grandparents, with whom the children are staying, have been denied permission to bring children home because they (the grandparents) are not Australian citizens.

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