Corvid-2020 Weekly Challenge #1

Hello Readers, I know we are all busy just trying to stay alive (welcome to the world of many trapped in refugee camps and in poverty), but if you have enough time (and photos, stories, poems in your archive), you may wish to participate in a new weekly challenge.  I am calling it the Corvid-2020 Weekly Challenge.  No, the virus hasn’t evolved.  A corvid is a type of bird.  The challenge will come out each Tuesday, all being well (if you know what I mean).

You can participate by creating a pingback to this post and/or by leaving a hyperlink to your submission in the comments.   Tag your post Corvid-2020, or C20WC.  I am looking forward to you joining me.

Here is my first contribution to kick it off.

corvid
Don’t Scratch Your Face

I must fly now (very punny).  I have to work out a way to get food to this self-isolating household.  The last plan worked for about 10 minutes.  No wonder governments everywhere are struggling to come to grips with this crisis.  Three cheers for all those government, health and logistics workers (paid and unpaid) who are working tirelessly to keep us safe and healthy.

Stay well.  Stay apart.  Join in.

Kind Regards.
Tracy.

Also linking in to the Ragtag Daily Prompt — Flounder.

Crisis Management

Australia today.

Given the shortage of Personal Protective Equipment for health workers and the shortage of test kits, Australia appears unprepared for Covid-19 to accelerate rapidly. Governments have a duty of care to take all necessary steps to prevent infection or face another catastrophe.  If the Australian government is not getting this advice, it is consulting the wrong people.  If Government is getting sound, evidence-based advice (including on the level of preparedness) and ignoring it, then that is a significant issue.  The advice of the Australian Medical Association should be heeded now.   Is this a re-run of the bushfire disaster?  I’m hopeful for a better response this time around.  Much is at stake.

Irrespective of official advice, organisations that run public events and employ staff should consider the legal implications for their organisations, including the potential personal liability of directors/officials, if their event or business acts as a host for the spread of Covid-19.  They should also consider their duty of care to participants, staff and the wider community, including the impact on local health systems and critical supply chains.  Risk management should be part of all organisations’ planning.  Thankfully, many are doing just this and are leading the way in responding to the crisis.  Organisations/companies should not expect governments to indemnify them for bad decisions taken, should they?

Without a vaccine, enough PPE, or test kits, social distancing appears to be the only practical option to buy more time.  This is not business as usual.  Now where have I heard that before?

There is no time to waste, Australians.  I went to my doctor for my pneumococcal vaccine last week. I overheard the receptionist talking on the phone about a potential Covid-19 patient who they had sent back to their car to wait to be triaged there. The office staff gave the distinct impression of rabbits caught in a spotlight.

UPDATE – I have been hearing from friends who work in the health system that our governments have been too slow to ban community gatherings.  Those are on the front line are asking citizens to voluntarily quarantine themselves right now.  NOT TOMORROW BUT TODAY.  Act now to prevent the transmission of this virus in the community.

We (governments and the community) must do everything possible to protect front line staff and if that means being overly cautious, so be it.  Be calm, but act.

How apt this video seems now.  Sorry about the political stuff tacked on the end of it though.  Let’s keep politics out of it and be guided by best practice.

Regards.
Tracy.

Further information:

https://ama.com.au/media/ama-federal-council-covid-19-national-public-health-emergency

Grey Days

The carnivores have moved into the neighbourhood.  Over the last couple of years, we have had the occasional grey butcherbird visit but they don’t normally stick around.  February has been the exception.  The butcherbirds must have a nest nearby because a juvenile has been practising its maniacal cackle.  It is very endearing.  On the other hand, there have been few smaller birds around.  Too tasty, I guess.  Read more

Turning Flowers into Pumpkins and the Death of Holden

I got very excited this morning, ladies and gentlemen.  Looking out the back window, I could see that there was a male and female pumpkin flower open at the same time.  Because of a hail storm last month, my pumpkin vine has only one pumpkin growing at the moment.  So I took this fleeting opportunity to fly outside and manually fertilise the lady.  I found the flowers crawling with bees, which was also very exciting, because the numbers of bees have been much fewer due to the recent hot weather and smoky days.

It was lucky I did because a bee was trapped below the stamen of the boy flower! Read more

Just A Dabbler (And I Don’t Mean Duck)

Too many posts from me lately, ladies and gentlemen.  Not sorry.  Today’s Ragtag Daily Prompt is masterpiece.  I thought I would join in, because I can.  I’ve written some stories and very bad poetry in the past, and dabbled in mosaics.  Not every piece has to be a masterpiece.  In fact, most of my written pieces are full of grammatical and spelling errors, but you probably already know that. The moral of this story is go where your heart takes you (including to Yass to buy a raffle ticket).  Take that logic!

Here’s my Finnish Lapponian Dog mosaic of which I’m very proud.  That’s allowed, isn’t it?  Months of work were involved so it was very satisfying when I finally got the last tile stuck down and the grouting (approx 5 different colours) finished. Read more

When Things Go Wrong

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Namadgi burning / Canberra burning / Australia burning

Sometimes sh*t happens, ladies and gentlemen.  Or accidents happen, to be more polite.  Canberra’s beloved Namadgi National Park is on fire and the fire is heading towards Canberra’s southern most rural settlement, located just beyond the city proper.  It’s just been one day after wretched day for over a month now.  Many Canberrans will spend an anxious night and next few days.  Some southsiders in the path of the fire have already evacuated.  My family lives on the other side of town to the fire.  We are fine for now. Read more

What a Difference A Date Makes

Australian flag
Australian Flag (source – Australian Parliament House website)

It is Australia Day so I had better say something.  If you don’t already know, there has been much debate in the Australian community about whether Australia Day should continue to be held on January 26.  On 26 January 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip sailed into Sydney Cove to establish a penal colony for the British Empire. Read more