Bird 132 – Wren-like Rushbird

Hello Everyone, my last post was a bit serious, so it is time for something more engaging – Nathan Finger’s Bird Of The Week. My True Love normally gets a weekly email from Nathan. He has been sharing it with me as he has been working from home. I’ve discovered that all the info in the email is also included on Nathan’s blog. Nathan’s post this week is on wrens from across the world. It’s beaut. Entertaining and informative. Check it out.

Bird of the Week

Could this be the last week of lockdown? Who can say? Either way, while we keep holding down the lock your double weekly dose of birdie thoughts and feelings keeps circling like a Vulture in an updraft. 

Anyway, readers who have been with me for a while may remember the numerous Wrens we’ve featured. There was Lyall’s Wren, the Superb Fairywren, the Malle Emu-wren and the Musician Wren.

Now, looking at these birds you might think, hmm they don’t seem to have a lot in common. And you would be right. So what even is a Wren? Well, for this week’s bonus bird, I’m here to help you unravel that very term. I know, you’ve all been up nights stressing about it.

The word “wren” is rather fiendish. First, of those four birds, an ornithologist would only consider the Musician Wren to be a “True Wren”. There are…

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The times, bridges and the way of inanimate objects….

David Cox from Our Off The Grid Home, is all cynicism and wit. He often sums up the Western zeitgeist in offbeat and entertaining ways. And because I am too lazy to write my own post, David has succumbed to my charms and has agreed to let me share his thoughts on engines, the times (political and economics), and other fun stuff.
Thanks Dave. Check him out.

Our Off the Grid Home

Let us start with the inanimate objects – like engines.  Damn them!

I mean; I LIKE engines, I really do.  Power.  Work made easy and all that but…the damn things ‘act up’.  In and of itself an engine that acts up is to be expected but lately every engine in our lives is getting out of sorts.

My trusty little Honda 2000eu has crapped out after almost ten years of very dependable and hardy work.  And that little sucker ran perfectly even after being run over by a road grader!

My ‘pretty new’ Yamaha 50 is beeping when the key turns on…diagnosis to follow.  Sal’s little Suzuki had carburetor problems until I stripped it down, cleaned it in a sonic cleaner and reduced the problem down to the idle jet that I THEN over-reamed and made too big.  Gotta replace that mistake.  Someday.

I gave a small truck (1992  Chevy…

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Thanks and Admin Notice

Hello Everyone, I just thought I would let you know that I appreciated every comment on my last post.  It probably wasn’t the wisest decision to cover that incident but it is an important subject and I needed suggestions.  So thank you.  I have now closed comments on the post.  Somehow my bravery, make that bravado, has deserted me.  That’s all.

The End

 

Lens-Artists Challenge – Less Is More

This week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is hosted by Amy.  Her chosen theme is “less is more“.  Amy’s inspiration for this theme is a quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupery:

“A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” 

Now that is a very intriguing notion to me, because it seems to me that there is nothing more perfect than nature’s design. Read more

For Any – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

I recently read a blog that raised big, important questions around democracy and leadership. These issues are dear to my heart, and I suspect that I may attempt to untangle them in my own mind in the fullness of time. Knowing where we want to go is one thing, knowing how to get there is another. Perhaps the solution is easier than we think? Maybe it has something to do with choice? Ah, choice. Yet another concept that exercises my mind.

Anyway, in the interim, here is a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon that speaks to this matter in ways that I can only aspire to.

If you haven’t checked out Paul’s poetry, you really should. It is wonderful.

parallax

Power – Word of the Day

power-of-people.jpg

Photo: fiveglobalvalues.com

For Any

Gestures of power fall in different ways,
and becomes ways of being,
for good or ill,
either for self,
or, for community,
though neither to judged,
until power is imprisoned
and forced into perversion,
the servitude of the many for the one.
But beauty,
artistry,
compassion,
breath,
nature,
demand more,
they are great equations of true power,
neither for the one or the many,
simply love for any,
in this shared venture we call life.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul, pvcann.com

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Remembrance Day

I think it is always worth bearing in mind that there may be differing views held by service men and women and their families about Remembrance Day and other days commemorating military victories and defeats. I’ve heard these views expressed myself in articles I’ve read and radio interviews I’ve listened to. Some find it particularly galling that these commemorations are held with all due solemnity and fanfare and yet our elected representatives appear to have learnt nothing from these conflicts. Often there is much censure for daring to question the symbolism of the occasions. Here is a reflection on Remembrance Day by David Cox, whose father fought in WWII.

Our Off the Grid Home

I barely acknowledge it.  I don’t hate it like I hate some stupid societal rituals but I don’t feel what I should about it.  So, it comes.  It goes.  I should put on a better show than just buying a poppy, I suppose, but my father didn’t have much time for it.  I learned from him.   And he should know.

Seaforth Highlanders.  Italy.  WWII.

My father was wounded badly in a historic battle at Ortona.  Hit by heavy artillery. Lay hanging in a tree in the battle ground for three days.  Carried out on the dead cart.  Received a 100% disability pension.  They not only didn’t think he’d live, they thought that if he did, he’d be a vegetable.  And they were right for about 15 years – like the plant in the Little Shop of Horrors, though.  After that, he got a bit of life back but even then…

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