Bridge Under Troubled Water

This time of year is not meant to be our rainiest season.  Summer in Canberra (Australia) is normally quite dry.  We usually get most of our rain in winter.  But as you know, the climate is changing and Canberra may yet turn out to be a tropical paradise to rival sunny Queensland.  And if sea levels rise significantly, we may even become relatively coastal! Read more

Trip The Light Fantastic

This is my response to the Lens-Artists Weekly Photo ChallengeMagical Light.  Join me for a photo journey of light across the seasons.

In Australia, our light can be very harsh.  Generally, if the light is too harsh for photography, it is too harsh for me.  Nevertheless, I understand intuitively that different colours require different light, and that some colours create their own light. Read more

The Changing Seasons – August

Regular readers will know that in August, my true love and I went on holiday – a rather long road trip to visit my mother who lives about 1,500 north of me.  In the place I live (Canberra), the winters are freezing, grey and dreary.  In the north where I went (as far as Gladstone), it is relatively tropical, although they have had some coolish mornings.  To escape the cold, many retired folk, known as Grey Nomads, regularly spend months travelling the roads of northern Australia.  We had a taste of that life for a few weeks.  I’ve tried to do a bit of a ‘compare and contrast’ photo essay to represent my August. Read more

Blue for You

This is my response to the Ragtag Daily Prompt — Blue.

My thanks go to Margaret of the Ragtag Daily Prompt for today’s wonderful prompt.  If you too need some inspiration, click on the link above.  Such prompts help me make short work of presenting my holiday happy snaps.  I had hit a road block so to speak, as it was all just too overwhelming to think how I might present the story of my travels in a way that might be slightly interesting.  I hope the photos do justice to the wonderful holiday I’ve just had. Read more

I Am a Folk Festival

This is the last in my series of National Folk Festival (the Nash) posts.  The title of this post is taken from Canberra poet, Josh Inman’s poem, ‘I Am a Folk Festival‘, that I heard him perform at the Nash last weekend.  Josh said that the moment he steps through the gate he gets a shiver, a sense of freedom.  This perfectly sums up the way I feel about the Nash.  Josh said ordinary people live ordinary lives.  But the Nash is extraordinary.  It makes everything seem possible.  We can be extraordinary.  So, he would rather be a folk festival.  That really spoke to me.  I can be a folk festival too.  Is that too corny?  I guess you had to be there. Read more

Stand And Deliver

You will all be thoroughly sick of me posting about about my National Folk Festival (the Australian one) soon.  I post about the Nash like a mother posts about a new baby.  All. The. Time.  Have I told you it is my favourite place in the entire world?  Anyway, this post is about my favourite place within my favourite place —  The Stock Camp.

The Australian bush and the characters that inhabit it have become the stuff of legends;  they’ve entered into our folklore.  The traits of these pioneers – an independent streak, larrikinism, mateship, egalitarianism, belief in the fair-go, toughness, stoicism and courage – immortalised by poets such as Banjo Patterson and Henry Lawson, are meant to embody the Australian spirit.  If it all sounds to be good to be true, then it probably is.  Nevertheless, this spirit oozes from the Stock Camp at the Nash, and I love it.  Read more