Boom, Boom, Boom

Canberra (Australia) – Story by Tracy, your intrepid (not) wildlife photographer. Until recently, I must confess to a lack of intellectual curiosity about why male kangaroos are colloquially called “boomers”. I spent half an hour googling this today but still am none the wiser. My curiosity was ignited on last weekend’s walk at our local nature reserve. I wonder whether it is related to the loud grunting noise male kangaroos make when they are courting? Spoiler alert – this roo story involves courting.

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Sun Worshipper

As today’s Ragtag Daily Prompt is diurnal, I thought I would post a couple of photos of the eastern long-necked turtle.   The (Australian) eastern long-necked turtle is a sun-worshipper.  It is a cold-blooded, diurnal animal.  These small fresh-water turtles are most active mid-morning and afternoon once they have warmed up.      Read more

Tiny Treasures

This is my response to the Ragtag Daily PromptManufacture.  I’ve finally come up with the an idea for my next mosaic.  After my last huge effort, I am looking to do something small, literally.  I like to make mosaics from my own photos, but in this case I won’t be able to.  I should be so lucky to see an endangered mountain pygmy possum! Read more

Strange Aquatic Creatures

Today’s post will introduce two very strange aquatic creatures found at one of Canberra’s nature reserves — the first, one very odd looking duck, and the second, quite duck-like.

Australia’s musk duck looks half-fish, half duck.  It must be the oddest looking duck I’ve ever come across.  It is so named because it is very smelly, emitting a musky smell from scent glands on its rump.  Musk ducks spend most of their time in the water.  They even sleep on the water.  They can fly, but launching from the water or ground is hard work, so they do so infrequently.  When fleeing predators, they choose a watery escape rather than take to the wing.   Read more

It Is Okay To Stick Your Beak In

In my previous post, I mentioned that my love and I had gone out to the river for a sticky beak.  It soon became apparent that not everyone understood this strange Aussie/Kiwi colloquialism, with a number of readers requiring a translation.  In response, I thought I should provide a general explanation for those too polite to ask for a translation.  Which is completely fitting as the explanation links in so perfectly with today’s post (unintended) about one of our most weird and wonderful mammals, the short-beaked echidna — a real sticky beak. Read more