To The Margins

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
To The Margins

Light rain veils the clouds, blanketing shadows, 
Pushing them to the background, to the margins.
Autumn provides context to our marginal existence.
Stuck on the precipice,
Brightly coloured leaves hanging precariously
On the gallows of misspent time.
Time wasted, time lost to inaction, to
Indolence, graft and protectionism.
Protectionism, but not protection.
The latter is too high a price to pay.
Money does not grow on trees, invested
For those rainy days that wash farm to sea
And homes under high water mark until
Light rain veils the clouds, blanketing shadows.

NaPoWriMo #27

Rain Or Shine

Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, ladies and gentlemen, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.

International readers may not have heard that parts of eastern Australia have copped yet another drenching and houses and businesses have been flooded again less than a month after the last deluge. More lives have been lost. It seems we will soon be a country of environmental migrants (note: environmental refugee is not an officially recognised term). If we can’t adequately look after our own environmental “migrants”, then how on earth will we be able to offer reasonable assistance to the hundreds of millions of environmental refugees (let’s call it what it is) expected in the future under current climate warming projections?

It seems nothing is going to stop Aussie state and federal governments and their so-called independent planning agencies approving more new coal and gas projects.

I could be churlish and note that the former deputy PM in the current national government suggested that Pacific Islanders would survive climate change because they come to Australia to pick our fruit! It is no wonder some Pacific nations are making their own arrangements to secure their future.

Anyway, I couldn’t help wonder whether the Byron Bay BluesFest would be held this Easter given the flooding in that region. Apparently it is going ahead.

Photo by Max Ravier on Pexels.com

I read that some displaced people currently in emergency accommodation will need to move outside the Byron area temporarily due to the influx of tourists to the region over Easter. It never rains, it pours. What’s the forecast? Anyway, a certain video streaming service must have been reading my mind because it presented me with Australian artist, Xavier Rudd, who will be performing at BluesFest. Here is a short film made for his song, Stoney Creek. Let’s have a listen to it.

I hope the sun shines on the festival. It has been very difficult over the last couple of years for musicians and all the ancillary businesses that rely on the show going on for their livelihood.

Take care, everyone. Stay safe.

Kind Regards.
Tracy.

That Will Be The Day

The wild weather keeps coming, doesn’t it? We don’t have to wait to know how incredibly difficult sustaining life, livelihood and shelter will become if we exceed 1.5c degrees of warming.

All over the world, we are already experiencing the results of poor climate policy decisions. It has been a particularly stormy few months in eastern Australia, and it makes me wild. Like the wind. It does not pay to get too attached to your garden or the trees, for Canberra, the bush capital, is being rapidly re-modelled.

Read more

Corvid-2020 Weekly Challenge #10

Welcome to Week 10 of my Corvid-2020 Weekly Challenge.  Corvids are birds belonging to the Corvidae family, encompassing ravens, crows, magpies, jays and nutcrackers.  So peruse your corvid photo, poetry, music and story archives and join the challenge.

You can participate in the Corvid-2020 Weekly Challenge by creating a pingback to this post (my pingback approval settings are set up for manual approval, so it may take a little while for your pingback to appear) and/or by leaving a hyperlink to your submission in the comments.   Tag your post Corvid-2020 or C20WC.  I really do hope you will join in.

My turn now. Read more

Window On Time

In a few days it will be the 17th anniversary of the bushfires that ravaged Canberra (the national capital of Australia) and its surrounds in 2003.  With bushfires currently burning to the west of the territory, Canberrans are understandably anxious.  It’s old news but some may be interested in this disaster.  In many ways, the Canberra bushfires brought about a much broader call for research and action to better understand and respond to bushfire risk.  Here are the sanitised details of that event —

On 18 January, two fire fronts combined to create a 25 km fire front and wind gusts of up to 65 km per hour propelled the fire towards Canberra. The Chief Minister declared a state of emergency at 2.45 pm and the firestorm hit the outer streets of Duffy at approximately 3 pm, and soon reached [other] suburbs ….  Four people were killed by the fires, more than 435 people were injured and there were 5000 evacuations. Approximately 160,000 hectares were burnt which equated to almost 70 per cent of the ACT’s pasture, forests and nature parks including Namadgi National Park, Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve and all government pine forest west of the Murrumbidgee River Stromlo pine plantation.  There were approximately 488 houses destroyed and many more were damaged.Read more

Respect

Australia burns and Friday song day.

Greetings, ladies and gentlemen.  Welcome to my regular Friday song/tune day, where I pick a piece of music that reflects my mood or the times, to share with you.  Regular readers may have noticed that I skipped my Friday song day last week.  With Australia burning, I just didn’t have the heart for it.  I feel much the same this week, but, you know, it’s like falling off a horse …. Read more

In The Firing Line

Australia burning — Dear Readers, one of my favourite poets and all round nice person, Frank Prem, is currently writing a series of poems on the bushfire crisis that is underway in Australia.  Frank is the author of Devil In The Wind, a collection of poems about the personal accounts of those who experienced and survived the horrendous Black Saturday bushfires that swept across Victoria (Australia) in 2009.  That book was published last year.  Needless to say, I won’t be reading it until the smoke has cleared.

For those of you who may not know, Frank lives in an area that is currently sandwiched between two enormous out-of-control bushfires.  This brings a poignancy and emotion to his poems that will touch any reader.  These poems are laments for what is, what was, what could have been.  Frank writes for all of us who are caught up in this situation.  Check out his poems on his website at https://frankprem.wordpress.com/blog/ .

I want to share with you a couple of photos that my husband took in Namadgi National Park a couple of days before Christmas. Read more

New Beginnings

Australia burning —  I wonder whether those thousands of people that are sheltering on isolated east coast beaches, overwhelmed by acrid smoke — in towns where supplies are running low and where some unprincipled grocers charge exorbitant amounts for a few basic supplies — are contemplating jumping on small, overcrowded boats and sailing across treacherous waters to New Zealand?  I wonder whether these prospective boat people — call them climate refugees, if you will — might beg the New Zealand government grant them asylum and a new beginning?  I wonder how New Zealanders might react to such requests?  I wonder ….

I wonder how far-fetched this actually sounds?