Hi there, I’ve been inspired by Brian from Bushboy’s World to participate in the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge hosted by Lisa from Eyes Wide Open. The topic of this week’s challenge is birds with a “B” in the title of their name. However, before I launch into it, I would just like to make a speech on wildlife photos.

First I would like to say that the wildlife photographers I’ve interacted with online have been unstinting in their kindness and helpfulness with suggestions for taking good wildlife photos. I’m incredibly appreciative of that, even if from time to time I feel a little intimidated because my gear is not the latest and greatest; I can’t (refuse?) to get up at daybreak to take advantage of the lovely soft morning light; I don’t plan; my backgrounds are often messy, etc. I guess one might describe me as a happy snapper who likes “nature” and who just goes with the flow. I’m a total opportunist, and sometimes I get lucky (well, maybe it isn’t all luck these days).

It is not that I don’t want to improve. I do, but that’s not my mission. Anyway, I want to encourage you whether or not you have a super-duper camera, whether or not your wildlife photos are entirely in focus or not, whether or not your subject is hidden by a busy background, etc, firstly, because it is fun, and secondly, one day you might take a shot of something that is interesting to you and that something interesting might be rare, endangered or even thought to be extinct and without your photo, we would never know. Never hope. No, I haven’t taken a photo of something thought to be extinct, but it could happen, if I’m in the right place at the right time.

Anyway, getting back to the point of this post, here are a couple of B birds that I would like to contribute to the challenge. The first is the Grey Butcherbird (Cracticus torquatus). It likes to butcher. A bird’s gotta eat.

The second is a White-browed Scrubwren (Sericornis frontalis) or Scrubby for short. Did someone mention lighting? Oh well.

So there you go. Happy snapping.

Kind Regards.
Tracy.

47 thoughts on “My Best Birds

  1. I agree with all your comments about the supportive community of photography bloggers – and all bloggers actually. You’ve definitely leant quite a few kills along the way Tracy. I can’t join in, lacking a photo of a bullfinch, a buzzard, a barn owl, a bluetit. Oh, hang on. I wonder if I have one of a blackbird?

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  2. Tracy, I appreciate your comments on this post! I always want my photos to look the very best possible. I compare to others and know I have a long ways to go. I need to remember that sometimes it’s not the quality of the photo but the content. I see others post interesting photos and they are not always perfect. And I so those with PERFECT photos!! Thank you for the reminder to have fun and see the interesting aspects of my photos (and others). Great post and well, that top photo is just cool 😎 (he’s got “attitude” )

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    1. Thank you for commenting, Lisa. I’m glad I’m not the only one that feels a little awe struck from time to time.
      I always enjoy visiting your lovely blog, Lisa, and seeing with whom and what you are sharing your world. I like that connection. I like to be inspired too and learning from others who have a passion for photography, but the learning has to be fun too, don’t you think? 🙂 One of the gentlemen I follow provides some links to some really useful photography resources. He says that knowledge of the behaviour of animals helps us take better photos. That is true, but that shouldn’t stop those of us with imperfect knowledge from getting out there because there is a lot we can learn by doing and observing.
      That was a very happy butcherbird. I felt like getting a napkin and wiping its beak, lol. 🙂

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      1. What nice feedback Tracy! 🤗 And you made me laugh, as I did notice your butcherbird had a messy beak!
        And yes, I want to make sure not to take my photography too seriously. I get so much enjoyment out of it and I am always experimenting. But… I do want to get better and learn. But at the moment I don’t want to spend hours watching on line videos to do that. I just get impatient. I’m the one that reads the instructions last 😁

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  3. I also scrolled back to see that “fluffy bum” made me smile. Good comments too Tracy. It should certainly be fun if it is a hobby. Maybe a different story if you have to earn a living with your photos. You’ve caught that Butcher birds character.

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    1. I don’t envy professional photographers having to make money from their vocation, Pauline. I did buy a couple of photos taken by my friend, but he also had a framing business. He is retired and lives on the GC now. I guess you have to really hussle – lead tours, take workshops, etc.

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  4. I’m so happy you joined us! Great speech! We don’t judge you or your equipment. I don’t have the most up-to-date equipment. I do have the nicest lens I’ve ever had, but it’s not a super high dollar camera setup. I love seeing photos of birds…period! And I think everyone who joins in agrees with that. I didn’t go to school for photography. I learned by doing. I’m on my 3rd digital setup in 20 years. I’ve never had a pro camera and still don’t. I’m glad Brian suggested you join us and hope you do so as often as you like. I am one of his biggest fans even though I haven’t visited his or anyone’s blogs lately. The holidays are here and I’m busy all day getting orders out for my Etsy shop. Love your captures! Welcome to Bird Weekly! 🙂

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  5. I think your photos are great, Tracy! And I love how you encourage the rest of us to just do our best, and don’t worry about having the latest equipment or to strive for perfection. I’m not a photographer, but I still enjoy taking photos. Plus, your advice works for almost any life situation.

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  6. Enjoyed, Tracy. It’s interesting the ‘Butcher Bird’ has a hook on the end of its bill just like our Double-crested Cormorants. I observed a cormorant tackle and devour a large fish the other day, and it was able to do so because of its hook. Keep up the good work. You’re right. Having fun is a big part of wildlife photography.

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    1. Thanks, Dave. The discussion in your last post was very helpful, but it did make me think that the fun side was somewhat missing. Maybe that’s a given?
      I’m not sure how the butcher birds might use that hook. It would be good to see how the butcherbirds use that hook in slomo. Maybe. 🙂

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  7. Totally with you being a happy snapper, Tracy! I openly admit I’m way too lazy to get up early for a good shot. 😂 As to lightning and stuff, I can only say Photoshop. 😉 (Although I’m actually not using that as it costs too much and make do with the program on my laptop and Snapseed on my phone.)
    Love your Grey Butcherbird and the fluffy bottom. 😉😀

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