The Changing Seasons – December 2018

It is a bit late for my December Changing Seasons post, but better late than never.

I think I am glad to see the back of December.  It was such a hot, steamy month.  Nevertheless, a month of storms meant it was very productive in the garden.  Hence, we had many visitors of the feathered kind. Read more

He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Possum

I spent several hours eating a lot of chocolate so that I could write a post today.  It was rubbish (the post, not the chocolate), so I ditched it.  Still suffering and not just because of the chocolate.  I must reform (new year’s resolution?) and prioritise my waistline (currently lack thereof) over my blog.  So when all else fails, post a photo! Read more

All Care And No Responsibility

There has been rather a bird deficit of late on this blog, so it is time for a couple of bird photos.  The Ragtag Daily Prompt is host, so it seems only fitting that I feature a cuckoo in today’s post.  Cuckoos lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species, leaving the host to do all the hard work raising the young.

On a recent trip to Tidbinbilla (a nature reserve outside of Canberra), I spotted a couple of Fan-tailed Cuckoos.  The Fan-tailed Cuckoo is an attractive little bird which lives in woodland and forests. Read more

Aussie Bigfoot – Macropods

Bigfoot dwells in Australia, but we call it macropod.  The term macropod is derived from the Greek words makros (meaning large) and poús or pod (meaning foot).

Macropods cover a group of marsupials that have large hind feet and which move by bounding.  They cannot move their legs independently and often propel themselves forward with the help of their tails.  They also raise their babies in pouches.  There are several species of macropod including kangaroos, wallabies, tree-kangaroos, pademelons, bettongs and potoroos, among others.  Today I thought I would share some photos of two species of macropod, the Swamp Wallaby and the Long-Nosed Potoroo, found at Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve, just outside of Canberra (Australia). Read more

Bridge Under Troubled Water

This time of year is not meant to be our rainiest season.  Summer in Canberra (Australia) is normally quite dry.  We usually get most of our rain in winter.  But as you know, the climate is changing and Canberra may yet turn out to be a tropical paradise to rival sunny Queensland.  And if sea levels rise significantly, we may even become relatively coastal! Read more