The Changing Seasons – January

January —  the season of abundance.  It can’t help it if it so hot.  Temperature records were broken again during January, including in my little part of the world.  Our town had four consecutive days above 40ºc, a new record.  Due to the bushfire hazard, many of our nature reserves were closed to the public.  So I’ve been housebound and cabin fever has set in.  Hence, this month’s post focuses on the small haven that is my garden. Read more

More Of The Same

This is my response to the Ragtag Daily PromptForecast.  To join in, click on the link.

It seems that this month, there is a new temperature record broken every other day.  Another scorcher is forecast tomorrow.  When the temperature dropped below 35c yesterday, I quickly hightailed it out to the surrounding bush.  Due to my mosaic project and hot weather, I’ve been terribly inactive and was afraid my legs would no longer work, but I can report that they are still in walking order.

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My photograph of a helicopter carrying water to a fire near Tidbinbilla (24/01/2019).

This is what happens when water becomes a commodity.  I predict that the former federal water minister will lose his seat at the next election over this debacle.

My thoughts are with Vanda from Our Other Blog:  Two Sisters and Two Points of View, whose town has been evacuated due to the bushfire emergency in Tasmania.

Stay safe and look out for your neighbours.

Regards
Tracy

For Any – a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon

I recently read a blog that raised big, important questions around democracy and leadership. These issues are dear to my heart, and I suspect that I may attempt to untangle them in my own mind in the fullness of time. Knowing where we want to go is one thing, knowing how to get there is another. Perhaps the solution is easier than we think? Maybe it has something to do with choice? Ah, choice. Yet another concept that exercises my mind.

Anyway, in the interim, here is a poem by Paul Vincent Cannon that speaks to this matter in ways that I can only aspire to.

If you haven’t checked out Paul’s poetry, you really should. It is wonderful.

parallax

Power – Word of the Day

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Photo: fiveglobalvalues.com

For Any

Gestures of power fall in different ways,
and becomes ways of being,
for good or ill,
either for self,
or, for community,
though neither to judged,
until power is imprisoned
and forced into perversion,
the servitude of the many for the one.
But beauty,
artistry,
compassion,
breath,
nature,
demand more,
they are great equations of true power,
neither for the one or the many,
simply love for any,
in this shared venture we call life.

©Paul Vincent Cannon

Paul, pvcann.com

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All Kinds of Awful

The Queensland Resources Council has just announced that Queensland (Australia) coal exports have reached a record high.  The Australian government must be jumping for joy, with the resources sector once again contributing substantial growth in federal revenues (and the election war-chest).  Apparently two thirds of our coal is destined for steel making, while the remainder will be used for power generation.

Maybe it is just sour grapes, but the news does not lighten my current mood or temperature, which can best be described as volcanic.  Why?  Because short-term gains are being put before long-term national interests, and because I am sweltering in my lounge room through yet another extended extreme heatwave.  My phone tells me it is 41º celcius (105º F) outside. Read more

F is for ….

Fairy and features.

Dear readers and fairy enthusiasts, a while ago I decided to make a mosaic of a fairy.  Every garden needs a fairy, right?  I had never made a mosaic of a human-like form before, so I expected it to be quite challenging.  And indeed, it was.   It turns out it is difficult to mosaic a tiny face, all of 2sq centimetres, and I made rather a mess of it.  Nevertheless, as imperfect as it was, my friend decided she would buy it for her grand-daughter.  Read more

Chip Off The Old Block

I come from a long line of procrastinators.  It is kind of genetic.  There is always a tension about what constitutes over-sharing and yet it is apparently important to speak up about mental health issues, despite the discrimination this induces.  I’ve always had problems concentrating and getting started.  Organisation is not my forté.  I’m not sure whether anyone noticed.  Girls are good at hiding that stuff.  Plus I was kind of smart and I had compensation strategies that got me by.  I got through my first degree somehow (burning the midnight oil and eating a lot of chocolate).  I got a job in the government and worked my way through some of the ranks (burning the midnight oil and eating a lot of chocolate).

I was the Taskforce queen.  I could pull it out of a hat when deadlines were tight (it takes a lot of adrenaline to get my mind out of first gear).  Routine jobs?  Tedious and stressful (probably because they involved organisational skills that I did not possess).  I live in nuance, and that is often an uncomfortable place to be for a policy adviser.  (I do have some sympathy for our former prime minister who was constantly being criticised because he couldn’t give a simple answer.)  It is hard to sum up complex policy considerations in three talking points.  Still I managed, because you know, hard work.  It is the solution to everything, right?  At least that is what I thought.

Trigger warning.  This post contains material that may distress some readers. Read more

It Is Okay To Stick Your Beak In

In my previous post, I mentioned that my love and I had gone out to the river for a sticky beak.  It soon became apparent that not everyone understood this strange Aussie/Kiwi colloquialism, with a number of readers requiring a translation.  In response, I thought I should provide a general explanation for those too polite to ask for a translation.  Which is completely fitting as the explanation links in so perfectly with today’s post (unintended) about one of our most weird and wonderful mammals, the short-beaked echidna — a real sticky beak. Read more