Art For Boldness Sake

Continuing the turtle theme (see my post of 13 March 2019), today I am sharing a photo of a mosaic I made a few years ago of a turtle (in abstract).  I love bold colours and, in winter, when my garden is devoid of colour, my colourful mosaics are sure to make me smile.

turtlemosaic

Kind Regards
Tracy

Response to the Ragtag Daily PromptBold.  Click on the link to join in.

Sun Worshipper

As today’s Ragtag Daily Prompt is diurnal, I thought I would post a couple of photos of the eastern long-necked turtle.   The (Australian) eastern long-necked turtle is a sun-worshipper.  It is a cold-blooded, diurnal animal.  These small fresh-water turtles are most active mid-morning and afternoon once they have warmed up.      Read more

The Silo On The Truck

I’m a big fan of road trips.  There is always something new and interesting to see on the journey.  Being stuck in slow moving traffic is no hassle, but instead a photo opportunity (provided one is not doing the driving).  Here is a photo I took a few years ago.  It is perfect for Frank’s Tuesday Photo ChallengeRound.  The silo on the truck goes round and round. Read more

Selective Hearing

Here is my response to the Ragtag Daily PromptDiametric.

One of the things I really love about the Ragtag Daily Prompt is the contributions from all our participants.  One of my favourite contributors (I have many) is Lois from On Pets and Prisoners.  She always comes up with just the right quirky photo to illustrate the prompt.  Today, I feel the need to respond in kind.  So here is my fun photo too. Read more

The Changing Seasons – February (Part 1)

My February Changing Seasons post will be divided into two parts.  Part 1 covers the serious stuff.  Part 2 will be more lighthearted.

February – in the dying days of summer, danger lurks.
The shrill wind blew of the calamity to come.
But no one was listening.

swish.jpg

Did you know that the UN declared 2010 to 2020 the Decade for Deserts and has called for urgent action to fight against desertification?  The main reasons are land-clearing for agriculture, over-grazing and other land uses (eg. mining), unsustainable land management practices and climate change.  In a vicious cycle, degraded lands hold less carbon and less surface moisture.  It is estimated that it takes 1000 years to generate 3 cm of topsoil and if the current rate of soil degradation continues, all the world’s topsoil could be gone within 60 years.  No topsoil.  No life. Read more