Parts of eastern Australia are currently experiencing record rainfall and some areas have been severely affected by flooding. Want a flood story? Not much to tell really. Scared the crap out of me though.

In 1988, my friends and I travelled up to Brisbane (Australia) to attend the World Expo. We stayed at my mum and step-father’s place. There was a small creek near their property. Anyway, it was pouring down rain but despite that, we were having so much fun at the Expo that we didn’t arrive home until late in the evening. It was dark and wet as we were driving. There was a lot of chatting. As we neared home, we flashed by a sign that said “Flooding On Road” or some such thing. I was about to yell stop, or just yell, when we plunged into this mass of water. No kidding, the water was everywhere, probably at least window height, maybe more. The car spluttered but kept moving. Our momentum somehow carried us through and the car lasted long enough to climb the rise and limp into the driveway before spluttering finally to a stop. There was water in the engine or carburetta.

Understandably, we were in shock. We then had to beep the horn to attract my mother’s attention because Zachie, the rottweiler, was not letting us get out of that car. The next morning we went to check on the creek. The water stretched at least 100 metres wide and was nearly two metres deep. We were lucky to have survived.

So Aussies, if you are copping a bucketing at the moment, please stay off the roads, especially at night.

I haven’t seen those friends for nearly 30 years. I wonder if they ever think about that night.

Here is a flower photo and poem in lieu of flood photos.

From The Depths

In the dark of night, creek becomes river.
Washes unsuspecting into whorling umbilicus.
In shining light of day, stretches out like translucent sheath.
Choppers hover overhead; photograph houses under water.
Thank our lucky stars for our amphibious craft.

There is currently no sign of flooding in my part of town but it is raining. Should I pack a bag just in case, do you think?

Keep swimming, ladies and gentlemen.

Kind Regards.
Tracy.

Note: Photo taken by my True Love.

58 thoughts on “From The Depths

  1. I went to that World Expo! Had a wonderful time. My friend and I stayed with my sister-in-law’s parents somewhere in the city. Glad you made it out the other side in that dash across the river!

    Liked by 4 people

  2. I feel your terror, Tracy. Whenever there are floods in Australia, and news items about localised flooding are shown there is *always* a shot of vehicles driving through flood water. I wonder why TV channels insist on showing this, since 15 cm of flood water is enough to float a small car, and there are enough idiots (I’m not including your family in that category as it was dark and you had an excuse) who think they can drive through flood water without endangering themselves.
    We’ve had almost 100 mm since this weather began- nothing compared with others, but the garden has had more than enough!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Jane, I was the idiot. Kind of. I knew that area was prone to flooding because it had flood indicators, but I am sensitive to accusations that I catastrophise so I didn’t say anything. That was also a time before mobile phones. The windows were fogged up and I was sitting in the back so I couldn’t really see how close to home we were. I clearly the remember the sensation in the car but I haven’t been able to name it until you mentioned floating. That was what we were doing. The road closed barriers were up the next morning but too late for us.
      Yeah, my garden has had more than enough too.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I did venture out when the rain eased a while ago, no floaties just an umbrella and camera but the grass is too long to wade through even paths I mowed a couple of weeks ago before the rain.

        Liked by 3 people

    1. Thankfully, my town only got a soaking, Dave, but for others it is a huge loss and very traumatic. There will be yet more losses to stock and wildlife.
      Thank you for the comment on the flower photo. That was my husband’s photo. I need to update my post to mention that.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Just for your overseas readers Tracy – At this moment ten million or 40% of Australians are existing under a severe weather warning, tens of thousands have been evacuated and stand to lose all. The Weather Bureau is actually guessing as to what will really happen – never in our recent history have three unusual weather systems collided like this and the computer modelling cannot cope. We are praying for a Tasman high to weaken to let the ‘bad stuff’ away from us. The rain is bucketing down here in the Southern Highlands . . . too much to hope for food to arrive ! Best to all affected – as the saying goes ‘I am, you are, we are Australian’ !!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Hopefully food supplies can be trucked in from the south, Eha. Albury Wadonga has a big distribution centre. Of course, the Hume has to stay open.
      I feel numb. I hope those water levels start dropping soon. How exhausting it must be for everyone who is caught up in this disaster. The loss of animals too will be weighing on everyone as well. Take care, Eha.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ten hours later . . . the rain system has travelled south to bring tomorrow’s worries to E Victoria and Tasmania . . . the governmental advice is for weeks-long problems for NW Sydney, N NSW and SE Qld . . . we pray to the Greater Powers . . . and a wonderful Sydney firm starting deliveries at 3 am managed to get thru; . . . . incredible to think over 3000 km of land have been affected . . .

        Liked by 3 people

  4. Must have been scary when you saw the creek the next morning and realised how risky ploughing through the water at night was. Glad to hear the story ended ok.

    Perhaps we should all, anywhere in Australia (and around the world nowadays), always have official paperwork, passport & a few spare clean knickers in a waterproof box ready to grab in times of disaster. Note: I could do without many things, but not clean knickers.

    I hope you remain dry and safe, Tracy.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. It was scar. All these years I have tried not to think about it.
      We are fine here unless the weather turns again. Vicki. I have to update my emergency kit again. I never thought of knickers. They are not so important as my pets and people, hence we keep two cars to fit us all in. I must order a bag of dog food. It normally comes from Brissie. I’m not sure what is happening up that way.
      I hope you get the best of the weather, Vicki.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. It was, Dries. A good dirt road is about as adventurous as I get these days and I always check the weather and conditions before I go on longer trips. How about you?

      It is a really big flood, Dries. Devastating for people and communities affected, not to mention wildlife. It may fix the mice plague but a horrible way to get some resolution of that. It does not help that many towns are built on the banks of rivers and on floodplains and now there are more and more people living in those areas.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Probably my greatest character flaw is that I cannot be “spontaneous” and don’t do anything on the “spur of the moment”. Even a trip to the shop turns into a plan with 3 alternates “just in case”. Should something unforeseen happen it can totally derail me. Needless to say I am not flourishing under the current conditions, but I am not alone.

        Liked by 3 people

  5. Whew; what a lucky escape. I’ve been in a swamped vehicle, but it was in daylight and an open 4×4 so getting out was relatively easy. I can so easily imagine your situation.

    I hope the weather is sparing you, and I’m feeling anxious for all my friends and whanau across the ditch.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. It can’t have been a picnic for you either, Su. We didn’t have time to think about it and I’ve been trying not to think about it for years.
      We have been spared, Su. It got a bit hairy at Queanbeyan though but thankfully the river peak was downgraded. Further north it is a different story. I’m sure those further south of us will be anxious to avoid it too.
      My son is currently at the south coast doing frog surveys. I’ve been a typical nagging mother about the need to be extra cautious.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. That must have been terrifying. How lucky you all were to get away with it. Naturally I’ve been watching the news about the floods and also noticed the number of cars attempting to drive through even though the SES chief and others have made a great point of saying don’t do it and even that a fatality is almost inevitable. Why don’t people listen?
    I feel sad to think of the animals, wildlife, farm animals and even family pets that have been swept away.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Yep, very lucky, Vanda.
      I think the risk-taking is giving emergency services quite a headache. I hope those north of us get a break soon. I hope feed is being brought in for stock. Many have lost their stores from the flood and the mice! What a nightmare. People must be at breaking point.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Wow. Quite a story. You are lucky to be here. This morning a little girl from my son’s class was telling everyone “there’s been so much rain that one house floated all the way to New Zealand!”. Sure is wet. We’re lucky to be up high here.

    Liked by 4 people

  8. A scary adventure, Tracy. Very scary. We hear on the news about the weather conditions and it was on TV too. Stay as safe as you can, and good idea with safety kits and two cars. Everything is scary in the world right now. I guess you are like me, worrying aboutr people and animals first. I once almost drowned in a pool swimming. I was diving when a hoard of people swam over me while I was under the water. I could not come up, bones and bodies and kicking feet everywhere. I can still dream of the panic. 50 years ago. May everything settle soon. Hugs to you all.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Yes, it was scary at the time, Ann-Christine, but thankfully it was over within less than a minute. How frightening for you too. As much as we put those moments to the side, it is hard to forget the terror.
      The drama is happening to our north (so far). For the tens of thousands people evacuated and the millions of people more widely affected, it is a nightmare. It is heartbreaking to see the devastation and distress.
      You can appreciate why people are so reticent about electric cars. They can’t be worrying about charging their vehicle when faced with an emergency.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hopefully it will turn better soon. Glad you are not in the middle of it. And – I had never thought about emergencies and electric cars…of course that is a problem.

        Liked by 2 people

  9. Sorry to hear about your weather woes. Canada does occasionally have localized flooding in the Spring but nothing on this catastrophic basis. Sorry!

    Liked by 4 people

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